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Oracle licensing consultants

Downloading Office for iPad? Get the Right Subscription for You

Apr 07 2014: Published by under Uncategorized

Miro’s Tim Hegedus sounds off on Office 365 on the heels of the release of Office for iPad:
http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/232839#

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Server Licensing and Moving Virtual Machines

Apr 01 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Compliance,Virtualization,Windows

A server, according to Microsoft, must always be licensed for peak capacity (the maximum number of concurrently running virtual instances). For example Windows Server 2012, with Standard Edition, your entitlement is one physical instance and up to two virtual instances.  In this kind of configuration, that physical instance can only be used to manage those virtual instances. What does this mean? If your server must periodically support three or four virtual machines, another Windows server 2012 Standard Edition license is going to be necessary on that same server. This is referred to as license stacking and it works quite cost effectively – until the number of licenses of Standard Edition exceeds the cost of the required Datacenter Edition licenses. The threshold for this is about 10 virtual instances. The 11th virtual instance on a single server would require a sixth Standard Edition license. At that point, instead of buying that sixth license, you might want to go with Datacenter Edition. Miro very often comments about how Software Assurance has evolved to become so much more than simply the ability to upgrade to the next version of the software and here is perfect example of that.

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Microsoft Audits: Enterprise Agreements doesn’t offer protection anymore

Mar 26 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Enterprise Agreements,Microsoft Licensing Compliance,Software audit

Microsoft audits have continued and perhaps even accelerated their pace over the last 12+ months. As Microsoft enters its fiscal fourth quarter, audits are anticipated to intensify. And, while Enterprise Agreements may have previously afforded some protection from an audit, that is no longer the case. Recently, Miro had been simultaneously working with four distinct Clients on Microsoft audits – and three of these Clients had active Enterprise Agreements!

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Licensing SQL server in low versus high density virtual environments

Mar 11 2014: Published by under licensing,Server CAL,software license,SQL,Virtualization

Licensing SQL Server is often confusing, and the rules have changed. Here is a snapshot of how to license in high and low density virtual environments:

For smaller environments or low density environments the option to license individual virtual machines can be considered. When licensing by core, each virtual core or virtual thread in a hyper-threading architecture must be allocated with a minimum of four cores per virtual machine.  This can be a very attractive configuration when the physical server is very dense and only a small percentage of the cores are supporting SQL Server.

–For the Standard Edition and the Business Intelligence (“BI”) Edition which can be licensed in “Server+CAL” metric, one server license is required for each VM.

For the larger or high density environments, the arithmetic works against the individual virtual machine licensing scheme, so licensing the physical server is more effective. In the “Server+CAL” metric, the license entitlement for the BI and Standard editions is one instance – either the physical instance or the virtual instance. For Enterprise Edition, which is no longer available except as an extension of Software Assurance, a single license in the “Server+CAL” metric entitles you to up to four instances.

You cannot have a conversation about Microsoft licensing without mentioning Software Assurance, and in this case Software Assurance also plays a key role in maximizing your virtual environment in the “Per Core” license model.  Unlimited virtual machines supporting SQL Server are an entitlement under two conditions:

(1) When all the physical cores are licensed; and

(2) When all of these licenses are covered by Software Assurance – in other words, unlimited virtualization in SQL Server has now become a Software Assurance benefit.

That same configuration is also necessary when virtual machines supporting SQL Server might be moved from one node to another within a multi-node cluster. Software Assurance will not only provide you with unlimited virtual instances but also license mobility.  Our recommendation is to plan that environment, look ahead very carefully, very deliberately, and then do the math and find out which way represents the most affordable method for you.

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PCI Compliance Considerations for XP’s End

Mar 07 2014: Published by under Compliance,Licensing Change Alert,Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Compliance,Microsoft Licensing Tip,Microsoft Windows,Microsoft: News You Can Use,PCI (Payment Card Industry)

We have talked about the end of support for Microsoft XP at length and its implications for users in regards to security and licensing, but thought it would be important to also make our clients and friends aware of the potential for non-compliance with PCI-DSS for any organizations using Point-Of-Sale (POS) payment application environments.

Requirement 6 in the PCI-DSS documentation requires that all users “Develop and maintain secure systems and applications.” Because Microsoft will no longer issue security updates after April 8th, this requirement will no longer be met. And just in case this is too vague, look at Requirement 6.1 (Ensure that all system components and software are protected from known vulnerabilities by having the latest vendor-supplied security patches installed. Deploy critical patches within a month of release).

Microsoft will continue to provide updates to its malware signatures in products such as System Center Endpoint Protection through June 2015. However, Microsoft would still refer to Windows XP after April 8, 2014 as ‘unsupported.’ So it could come to pass that malware may be detected, but Microsoft may not provide fixes in every case, leaving the customer to alternative mitigation strategies. Be aware that support for Office 2003 expires on the same date. Microsoft has not released any information concerning continued security-related support for this product.

As we have said before, we recommend making the switch to a newer OS to ensure you receive critical software updates and maintain a secure environment. PCI compliance is yet another reason to necessitate this switch.

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Third Party Support Company, Rimini Street, Loses Part of Legal Dispute with Oracle

Mar 06 2014: Published by under Oracle license

This is an important read . . .

The wider implications of Oracle’s Rimini licensing dispute

Companies may need to distinguish between software development work on commercial software they do themselves and what they pay an outsourcer to do on their behalf.

In a report following a recent legal dispute in the US, analyst Forrester has warned CIOs that if they have outsourced software customisation, maintenance and/or administration, they may be in breach of their licence agreements. Click here to read more.

 

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Subscription Based licensing – Pros and Cons

Mar 04 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Compliance,Microsoft Licensing Tip,Subscription based license

Whether you are considering moving from perpetual to subscription based licensing or starting up a new contract – here are some considerations before taking the leap:

Support – Subscription-based licensing for hosted services, such as Office 365, can offer a support reduction.  Small and medium sized businesses as well as large companies need to consider whether staffing a large support group and maintaining an ample infrastructure which includes both hardware and software support is truly economically feasible for themselves.

Flexibility – A “con” to subscription based cloud solutions are that they reduce your flexibility in opting for alternative technologies. Once a solution is entrenched in your day to day business operations, it’s quite difficult to switch to a different solution.  That’s pretty much true of all hosted solutions, but the cloud really does introduce some additional considerations. These are the kinds of questions that are most prudent for you to ask if you’re considering hosted services.

There are both capital expenses as well as operating expense advantages for both perpetual and subscription based licenses. Operating expenses advantages under perpetual could easily be offset by the monthly per-user charge by which Microsoft’s cloud services are licensed. It’s a matter of deciding whether that number is lower or higher than your current numbers, and knowing what works best in line with your business goals.

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Two Upcoming Webinars – Microsoft and Oracle Live Q&As – Sign up now!

Mar 03 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Compliance,Microsoft Licensing Tip,Microsoft Software Assurance,Microsoft Windows,Microsoft: News You Can Use,Miro News,Oracle license,Oracle Licensing Compliance,Oracle Licensing Tip,Oracle: News You Can Use,Software audit,software license

Sign up today for our next two Live Q&A Webinars – and get your questions in early to ensure that we can get to them. Looking forward to “seeing” you there!

Microsoft Audits & Licensing: Live Q&A with Miro Consulting

Microsoft licensing expert, Tim Hegedus, will answer audience-submitted questions – from managing compliance and reducing risks to tips on negotiating the best vendor contract. Previous topics covered Miro’s Microsoft event included: The End of XP Support, Negotiating and re-negotiating with Microsoft, Recent licensing changes and their effects on SLAs, Understanding volume licensing programs, Virtualization and licensing, How cloud computing will change the licensing landscape, Switching to Office 365, Software Assurance and what it means for you and SQL Server licensing.

March 11th @ 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET

Register here: bit.ly/1gVuEm5

Demystifying Oracle Audit & Licensing Complexities: Live Q&A with Miro Consulting

Are you interested in learning more about Oracle licensing? Have questions specific to an Oracle audit? Here’s your chance. For 30 minutes, Oracle licensing expert – Eliot Arlo Colon of Miro Consulting – will answer specific questions on Oracle licensing – from managing compliance, reducing risks, to tips on negotiating the best vendor contract.

Some topics that may be addressed include: changes in licensing, pre-planning for Oracle procurement, concerns over vendor audits, compliance issues, best practices for software asset management and concerns over the changing dynamic environment from mergers and acquisitions (M&A) to divestitures

March 18th @ 1:00 PM ET

Register here: http://bit.ly/1a6LgoS

 

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Is the end of life for Windows XP really going to happen?

Feb 25 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Tip,Windows

Is Windows XP done? Unfortunately, yes it is. The end is near. Doomsday for Windows XP is just a few months away. On April 8th, 2014, Microsoft will issue its last updates for this version.  On the same day that Windows XP gets its final updates, Office 2003 and all of it is included applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint and so on will also get its final security updates.

Those of you who have kept Windows XP and Office 2003 have a compounded issue with which to deal. April 8th is the last security update for both Windows XP and Office 2003 and without further security updates these products may simply not be safe to use in your environment any longer. With a little bit of research we found that since August of 2012 there have been 10 security bulletins issued just for Office 2003, half of them were rated critical.  There is no indication whatsoever that Microsoft will continue to support it either XP of Office 2013 beyond the April updates.

Make plans now to migrate to a newer version!

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Microsoft’s new devices and services strategy

Feb 18 2014: Published by under Microsoft,Microsoft Licensing Tip,Oracle

Do you recall when Bill Gates shared his vision of a computer on every desk? Nowadays, some of our knowledge workers don’t even have desks! Microsoft is responding and what we are seeing is a metamorphosis of the company and its offerings. Microsoft’s position is one where the company considers itself a devices and services company.

This is evidenced in the maturation of Office 365, in the Azure partnership with Oracle, and in the evolution of the Surface and RT tablets, and even in the Metro version of Windows 8.  Miro is seeing many of its Clients who are at least contemplating a move to these online services such as Exchange Online or Office 365.

What are the drivers?

  • Cost, obviously, but the benefit seems to be a little ambiguous at best.
  • The availability and performance demands that might exceed or somehow be beyond a client’s current capabilities. More commonly, an increasingly disparate and diverse workforce whose work lives and social lives, and the technologies that support them, tend to blend.

So, where does all that leave Microsoft?  As a service provider for those very same applications that has already been installed on the local desktop. However, as a subscription, hosted services represent an ongoing expense which can lock the customer into terms and conditions and a reliance on this application. And such terms can grow inflexible over time.

Not all the news is bad. If you examine these benefits and look beyond costs, the idea of ceding or relinquishing some control while gaining this fully managed environment capable of supporting your business and your staff, it could end up being beneficial to your business.

We do not anticipate seeing any departure on Microsoft’s part from annuity licensing and annuity pricing. We simply believe that there’s an attraction to multiyear agreements that’s just far too strong for Microsoft to give up. There will be options, of course, but those options will come at a cost. We also don’t feel that any of this will immediately change the landscape for the large established data centers. Adoption of new licensing schemes tends to occur a bit more slowly within those larger environments so Microsoft will continue to support the traditional licensing models (i.e., on-premise) while continuing to urge a migration to managed services and the solution-provider type of environment.

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